Monkey World assists governments around the world to stop the smuggling of primates from the wild.

At the Centre refugees of this illegal trade as well as those that have suffered abuse or neglect are rehabilitated into natural living groups.

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Monkey World News

rescue centre staff in appeal for herbs

Dorset Echo

STAFF at Monkey World have appealed for herbs and edible flowers to help feed creatures at the park. They need the plants for the diet of primates - particularly the 88 capuchins they have recently acquired. Dr Marina Kenyon, who has worked with capuchins at Monkey World for nine years, said: "Many plants, such as garlic, onion and fennel are used by capuchin monkeys by rubbing them on their fur. "They do this as part of a bonding exercise as well as using the herbs as insecticides to prevent against biting insects in the warmer months. "Many of the capuchins we have were taken from the wild as infants or born in captivity, so providing them with herbs and flowers they can use is a great way of encouraging their natural behaviour. "With such a large increase in our capuchin family we would welcome members of the public wishing to bring in rooted herbs such as these, as well as a number of seedlings and rooted plants that gibbons and woolly monkeys can use." Monkey World gave home to 88 capuchin monkeys in January when they were rescued from a medical research laboratory in Santiago, Chile. Monkey World is appealing for rooted plants or seeds of such plants as fennel, hibiscus, chives, marigolds, fuchsia, ficus, bamboo, banana plant, lavender and garlic. Staff say they don't want any plant or herb which has been treated with chemicals.

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