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Monkey World News

Marmoset is saved from life of misery

Daily Echo

THIS is Marcel, a six-month old marmoset found crammed into a small bird's cage during an animal welfare raid in Manchester. Rescuers were horrified to discover him alone, frightened and locked in near darkness last week, in the cage on top of a stereo speaker. Thankfully his future looks a lot brighter now after he arrived at Wool's Monkey World at the weekend. Staff at the 65-acre sanctuary, set up to give abused chimps a permanent home, are monitoring his progress and will slowly introduce him to other rescued marmosets at the park. Trafford Council animal welfare officer Ian MacFarlaine said he contacted Monkey World seconds after seeing Marcel. The shocked animal worker added: "He was living in solitary confinement, with curtains drawn, in a cage I would not say was suitable even for a cockatiel. advertisement "Monkey World have been fantastic and have helped us from the start in securing Marcel's welfare." What makes Marcel's plight even more saddening is that marmosets are very social, active animals in the wild, living in family groups of up to 15. Monkey World director Dr Alison Cronin said: "The fact he was removed from his mother and father at such a young age to be sold for the pet trade is just an atrocity. "The appalling thing is it's not illegal in this country. "Some of the most upsetting cases we come across are those concerning the British pet trade. "It saddens me that in a nation of animal lovers, the UK's pet trade is not regulated properly." Marcel has already been moved to a large holding pen, had a medical check-up and began introductions to his adopted family. Dr Cronin added: "Many primates are stolen or kept in poor yet legal conditions and find themselves as part of criminal investigations such as this one." Monkey World was established in 1987 and boasts 150 primates of 15 different species.

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