Monkey World assists governments around the world to stop the smuggling of primates from the wild.

At the Centre refugees of this illegal trade as well as those that have suffered abuse or neglect are rehabilitated into natural living groups.

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Monkey World News

Rehab for the cheeky monkeys

The Herald

Monkey Life Five, 6.30pm Amazon Heartbeat STV, 8pm IT IS the largest Monkey and Ape Rescue Centre on the planet, and now it's the focus of a new daily show from Five. Monkey World in Dorset is home to around 160 primates, of 15 different species, most of them rescued from a terrible life, and now in their very own monkey rehab. Five is not the first channel to feature Monkey World. And I should know. Stumbling across Monkey Business on some satellite channel on New Year's Day 2005 led me all the way to Dorset and a trip to the place itself. My ex liked monkeys, and I adopted him one, and then that summer we went to visit his adopted primate at the centre. That monkey was Charlie, whom we didn't get to see in a starring role last night, but he will no doubt be showing his bashed-up face at some point this week. Poor old Charlie came to Monkey World a drug addict, with cataracts in his eyes, a broken jaw, just four teeth and a heck of a nervous disposition. advertisement Charlie is part of the Bachelor Group, or the Hooligans as they are also known. Monkey Life did introduce us to the leader of the pack, Butch, described as slightly unhinged. Personally - and this is not purely on last night's viewing, remember; I've been studying this place for years - I think the behaviour of animal manager Jeremy Keeling is as strange as that of the other primates. Watching him sit among the nursery group, playing with Seamus, whom he hand-reared when his mother rejected him, and being groomed by the rest of the group, is a little odd. OK, I admit it, I'm just jealous as hell. I want to play with the chimps! Imagine getting to interact with these beautiful creatures on such an intimate level. And don't even get me started on the gorgeous orangutans, Ro Ro and Tuan, who were rescued from the pet trade in Taiwan and are about to have their second baby, bless their big hairy hands. Of course, it's not always a happy time in Monkey World and last night's show left us hanging, when Kuna the woolly monkey rejected her beautiful wee baby. If it lives, it will be only the second in the world to survive being hand-reared. Alison Cronin, the director of the centre, will do the best she can, as she and her late husband Jim, who sadly died after the making of this series, have done for all the primates they have saved over the 20 years the centre has been in existence. Amazon Heartbeat on STV showed us perhaps why it's sometimes easier to attract donations for charities with cuddly monkeys than sick human beings. The Vine Trust charity from Bo'ness have sent two medical ferry boats across the Atlantic to Amazonia to help the sick of Peru, in conjunction with local aid. Willie McPherson, executive director of the trust, explained the reasons for the boats, and when we saw a woman who had just given birth being saved from possible death, while being told the maternal death rate in Peru is 35 times that in the UK, it's obvious the great work these volunteer medics do. When engineer Stewart McKenzie spoke about the video he had watched before signing up for the programme, only a hard heart could fail to be moved by the tale of two little girls being kidnapped, having their corneas removed, and then being returned, blind, to their mother. The problem this show has, however, is how it comes over in the medium of TV. Sadly for the Vine Trust, Amazon Heartbeat doesn't really pump the adrenalin round the body in terms of exciting viewing.

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