Monkey World assists governments around the world to stop the smuggling of primates from the wild.

At the Centre refugees of this illegal trade as well as those that have suffered abuse or neglect are rehabilitated into natural living groups.

Rescue & Rehabilitation
Monkey World | Ape Rescue Centre

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Monkey World News

"Jungle" Jim Cronin 1952 - 2007

2CR

Jim Cronin, the man behind the Monkey World Ape Rescue Centre, has sadly died from liver cancer at the age of 55. He passed away over the weekend in hospital in his native New York, accompanied by his wife Alison, with whom he had run the wildlife park. His daughter Eleanor was also present, as was close friend and Monkey World head keeper Jeremy Keeling. Jim, or "Jungle Jim" as he became known to 2CRFM listeners set up the wildlife park 20 years ago in the Dorset countryside near Wool. The 65-acre park is now the home to over 160 primates who have all been rescued from various different circumstances. Spanish beach photographers, laboratories and the illegal pet trade are some of the different scenarios that Jim and his team have rescued apes from. Jim became a familiar voice to 2CRFM listeners, often appearing on the Breakfast Show to update us on events at the park. With his persuasive nature and infectious passion, Jim would frequently use these appearances to call us to action. In 1997, 2CRFM's listeners rallied together on Jim's request to help build a new house for our adopted chimp Charlie. Time, tools, materials and equipment were all given for free and "Charlie's House" was built. Charlie has since moved on to bigger quarters, but his old home is now the residence for many other chimps. Some of them, ones that we had been told all about by Jim in his weekly, colourful chats at breakfast. Now, Jim has sadly moved on from us too. He truly was a local hero. He was a man with an admirable passion and determination, not just for the welfare and conservation of primates, but for anything he chose to turn his attention to. He will be sorely missed, not just by his family and everyone at Monkey World, but by all of us here in Dorset and Hampshire who took him to heart. The on going work in the middle of the forest at Wool is a wonderful legacy for a remarkable man.

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