Monkey World assists governments around the world to stop the smuggling of primates from the wild.

At the Centre refugees of this illegal trade as well as those that have suffered abuse or neglect are rehabilitated into natural living groups.

Rescue & Rehabilitation
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Monkey World News

Woolly's special prize

This is Dorset

MEET Julio. This adorable little bundle is the latest member to join the family at Monkey World ape rescue centre at Wool, near Wareham. Rejected immediately by his mum, Cuna, little Julio was found by the park's staff the morning after his birth clinging for dear life to dad Bueno, who had instinctively wrapped his tail around the 313g baby to keep him warm. Although slightly bewildered by the tiny thing hanging onto him, Dr Alison Cronin, who runs Monkey World with husband Jim, said Bueno's actions undoubtedly saved the youngster from dying from hypothermia. Alison is now hand-rearing 50-day-old Julio, who has doubled in weight since his birth and feeds on a three-hourly diet of milk and banana. She said: "Bueno saved Julio's bacon and it showed that the baby was very strong. We tried to give him back to his mother, because this is not what we wanted to do, but she wouldn't have it. "Furthermore, only one woolly monkey in the whole of the world has been successfully hand-reared, so I wasn't very happy that we were going to be successful." Julio now spends all his time with Alison, kept warm by a blue blanket and a microwave heat pack. He has also just started wearing tiny nappies, provided by the premature baby unit at Poole Hospital, in a bid to keep the mess to a minimum. Alison makes comforting woolly monkey noises to Julio and has hung a mirror in his cage in a bid to familiarise the baby with the environment he will eventually return to. Despite already having cut all his teeth and displaying an amazing strength in his hands and his tail, Julio cannot yet walk or feed himself, which he will need to do before he can be put back into one of the two woolly monkey groups at Monkey World. Alison said: "I think we've got another two months to go. He can already climb well but he has to be able to walk and feed himself, so we are not out of the woods yet. The odds were stacked against him and he's doing well."

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